The TDI is the mechanism against which TCT can evaluate the effectiveness of its transport service delivery interventions as it relates to the various user groups across different income brackets and in different areas of the City. The TDI identifies four user groups: three People User Groups and one Goods User Group.

The City of Cape Town's Transport Development Index (TDI)m the first of its kind, was inspired by the internationally reknowned Human Development Index (HDI), which is a statistical tool developed to measure the country's overall achievement and incremental movement towards a data-rich baseline.

The TDI is the baseline for understanding the state of transport in Cape Town, as determined by the people (public transport, private car, NMT) and goods (freight) user groups.  

TDI: A Rubric for Integrated Transport

The TDI provides a rubric through which TCT can evaluate the effectiveness of its transport service delivery interventions to the various user groups across different income brackets and in different areas of the City. In the TDI, four user groups are identified: three people user groups and one goods user group. In particular, these are:

People User Groups

  • Public Transport
  • Private Car
  • Non-Motorised Transport

The key factors that affect the People User Groups are:

  • Geography: data has been collated across certain transport analysis zones
  • Income: data has been collated for low, low-medium, medium and high income groups

Goods User Group

  • Freight

The key factors that affect the Goods User Group are:

  • Geography: City-wide
  • Size and type of freight vehicle
  • Economics: the specific condition necessary for the freight type to move

Following on from the Transport Development Index’s core responsibility, which is to determine the baseline against which service delivery is to be benchmarked against, is the comparative Mobility Index, which has been based on the similar parameters of the AD Little Mobility Index. This will allow Cape Town to evaluate its service delivery response internationally. The TDI identifies the access priorities of each of these user groups and their related costs.  

These priority costs can be categorised as follows:

  • Direct Costs: the ‘sticker price’ associated with a journey such as the price of a ticket or the monthly expense of fuel for a private car
  • Indirect Costs: these can be financial or otherwise, and are the additional costs incurred during a journey. They include the cost of personal safety measures due to transit, and the other costs resulting from unreliable schedules or vehicles, congestion, flexibility or reliability costs
  • Incidental Costs: these are the costs borne by society and individual commuters, and include items such as additional childcare and electricity used because the commuter must leave earlier and come home later