STATEMENT BY THE CITY’S MAYORAL COMMITTEE MEMBER: TRANSPORT AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, COUNCILLOR BRETT HERRON

This morning the City unveiled the six proposals that we have received from the private sector for the development of the Foreshore Freeway Precinct in the Cape Town central business district. The exhibition of these models marks a historical moment in the city’s urban development. It gives us a glimpse of the future by demonstrating how transit-oriented development can transform Cape Town’s spatial reality.

We – the City, residents and developers – now have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reshape one of the most valuable, vital and iconic precincts in the Mother City. The three unfinished highways on the western, central and eastern side of the Foreshore Freeway Precinct are almost as iconic as Table Mountain itself.

At the centre of this precinct is a strip of City-owned land – 6 ha in size and 140 m wide – that is located under and between the existing and unfinished highways between the city’s northern edge and the Cape Town Harbour.

The proposals for this strip of land must address Cape Town’s traffic woes and affordable housing needs. It must materialise our vision of transit-oriented development. Moreover, it must leave us with a lasting legacy – one that will add to the attractiveness of Cape Town as an international destination, and at the same time assist us to address the challenges of a steadily growing city centre.

The development of the Foreshore Freeway Precinct will be on a scale never seen before in Cape Town. We expect it to resolve some of the challenges that are currently preventing us from realising the city’s full potential – the lack of mobility being key.

This venture is the City’s first TOD project and will serve as an example of how the City can use development as the catalyst for spatial transformation. It sets the scene for what we can achieve when we think out of the box. It demonstrates what could be possible elsewhere in the city where we intend to implement TOD projects in creating efficient, inclusive and sustainable communities.

With the development proposals now open for public viewing, all of us have the opportunity to participate in reengineering Cape Town.

I encourage our residents to view all six of the exhibitions at the Civic Centre and to tell us what they think. These comments will be collated by the multidisciplinary Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC) who will take the public comments into account as part of the extensive evaluation process that will result in the selection of the preferred bidder(s). The evaluation process will also include the assessment of key components of the project, including the viability of the transport solution, the provision of affordable housing, and the financial model.

The BEC will, after the conclusion of the public viewing period on 21 March 2017, assess and evaluate the six development proposals. This process will take approximately four months due to the technical complexities and scale of the development.

During this time, the bidders will be requested to present their proposals to the BEC where they will have to unpack all of their plans and respond to questions.

Once the presentations have been made, the BEC will deliberate and announce the recommended qualifying bidder(s). The qualifying bidder(s) will sign an agreement with the City of Cape Town which will set out the conditions and requirements of the rest of the process to be followed – including the technical parameters, the prerequisite financial guarantees, phasing, and investment plan.

The next six-month phase will commence on the date of the signing of the agreement. During this time the preferred bidder(s) will have to secure the financing for the project, determine phasing and dependencies, and refine the technicalities. A formal review of the progress will take place after three months, and the qualifying bidder(s) will have to provide the BEC with a detailed progress report.

The outcome of the BEC and Bid Adjudication Committee procedures will determine the subsequent planning processes and future public participation. Ideally, we would like to see the first work on site to be happening within two years after the contract has been awarded.

Thus, the City would like to see the planning and approval processes concluded within two years. Formal public consultation processes will take place in accordance with the Municipal Planning By-law and Municipal Finance Management Act during this time and as the project is implemented.